Bay Village Landscape Renovations and Shoreline Restoration
Fort Myers Beach, FL

AERIAL SITE PLAN VIEW
PLANTS USED FOR LIVING SLOPES AND SHORE
REVIEW THE PLANT LISTS AND SPECIFICATIONS


BUILDING 1 | BUILDING 2 | BUILDING 3| BUILDING 4 | BUILDING 5 | BUILDING 6 | BUILDING 7


Introduction and Plants Photo Page

The site conditions at Bay Village, Fort Meyers Beach, FL present an excellent opportunity to institute Living Shoreline landscape management for stabilizing eroding shorelines. Mowing to the edge of the existing mangrove fringe has accelerated run-off carrying soil from the site into Ostego Bay, over time creating a sharp drop off from the shore's edge to a bottom depth which is too deep for new mangrove recruitment and establishment.

The purpose of the no-mow zone is to allow widening of the mangrove fringe which has been undermined to a single row of plants clinging to the edge of the shoreline. Creating a no-mow zone on the landward side of the mangrove fringe allows the natural salt marsh grasses, small shrubs, and wildflowers to form a buffer which will trap the carriage of soil particles being washed down the slope.

Gaps in the fringe will be fortified with Saltmeadow Cord Grass and 3 -year red mangrove saplings. The mangrove fringe will then naturally widen by moving back into the shallow area of the salt marsh. This will widen the fringe more proportionately to the slope of the mow area, sufficient to create a final swampy "sink" between the marshy soil trap and the Bay. The result will be new formation of a shallow shelf leading into the Bay, stabilized by ecologically- appropropriate layered soil trapping vegetation.

To harmonize the naturalized area of mangrove fringe, to add low-maintenance color to the entire site, and to dispense with unnnecessary shrubs which are being maintained but cannot thrive and are not producing well for the work which is put into them, other maritime plants will be planted in beds with the goal of establishing permanent colorful ground covers, for their improved aesthetics and to reduce large areas of mulch.

Living Shorelines References

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/northwest/ecosys/section/living_shorelines.htm

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/news/articles/2008/0812_Shorelines.htm

http://www.habitat.noaa.gov/restoration/techniques/livingshorelines.html

 

Maritime Plants to enhance the Living Shorelines Model of Decreasing Erosion which will be added to add color and harmonize the restored fringe with the overall landscape design

Railroad Vine

Railroad Vine is a shoreline stabilizer which will be planted along the landward edge of the no-mow zone, the length of the entire shoreline. The flowers are large and colorful, while the advantage is the strong runners which act as straps or bands to hold sandy shorelines together

dwarf firebush

Dwarf Firebush (Hamelia) will be used to replace shrubs such as hibiscus and old oleander which are not thriving. This is a soft texture shrub which needs only light occassional trimming and is always in bloom.

Saltmeadow Cord Grass

Saltmeadow Cord Grass (Spartina patens) will be used in the no-mow zone to fortifify those areas where gaps have formed in the mangrove fringe. It functions as a soil accreter and will catch run-off particles from rain events. It is also going to be planted in a double row along the shoreline cut-in between Building 2 and Building 3 to achieve more soil build-up there to widen the angle of the cut to a more gradual curve.

Gaillardia

Gaillardia (Indian Blanket Flower) above will be mixed lightly in large beds of Beach Sunflower, below

Beach Sunflowers

Beach Sunflowers are easily maintained with occasional line trimming to shape the bed, They are always abundantly in bloom

Sea Oats

Sea Oats in the slope landscape beds will not only accrete soil but will be a harmonious seaside grassy accent groundcover which will eliminate the need for shrub trimming where used.